Renewable Energy Project Finance Analysis at NREL – February 2011

On Fri, Feb 25, 2011 at 11:35 AM, NREL RE Project Finance <re.finance> wrote:

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Renewable Energy Project Finance Analysis at NREL

February 2011

Here’s the latest from the Finance Analysis Team at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

First Known Use of QECBs will Save Yolo County at Least $8.7 Million over the Next 25 Years

NREL recently published a case study describing an innovative municipal financing structure for a solar PV installation in Yolo County, California.

The project is noteworthy because it represents the first known use of qualified energy conservation bonds (QECBs) and the first known combined use of QECBs and clean renewable energy bonds (CREBs) in the country.

This article outlines the process the county underwent to finance the installation as well as the strategies for optimizing the use of these new bond tools.

A graph showing the breakdown of funding sources compared to project cost. The diagram also shows that the net present value of the CSI's production-based incentive roughly equals $2.5 million over the first 5 years of the project's operation.

Market Insights Blog

A California Utility Seeks to Invest In Montana Wind

San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E) is thinking outside the box. More

Schematic representation of the relationship between SDG&E, NaturEner, the Project Holding Company, and the Project Company. Schematic shows that SDG&E contributes 79.99% of tax equity investment and receives tax benefits, net income after tax, and green attributes. NaturEner contributes 20.01% of common equity and receives tax benefits and net income after tax.

DOE Releases New Solar Procurement Guide for Federal Agencies

Obtaining solar energy for a federal agency can be an intricate process. More

Photo of a large group of people in costume working together to build an intricate human pyramid.

Green Power, and RECs, and Marketing, Oh My! FTC Revises Rules

Proposed Federal Trade Commission rules may impact third-party ownership models. More

Illustration: The Wizard of Oz sits perched on a stool.

California Tradable REC Decision Issued

Eight-month logjam lifted. More

Photo of barbed wire surrounding an electricity substation.

Wanna Improve Financing of RE Projects? Include a Charitable Organization

So, what is an L3C? More

Bar chart with one bar depicting total project costs for equity, debt, and L3C funds.

Keeping Up with the Joneses? It Might be Easier if you Combine Energy Efficiency with Solar PV

Considerations for policymakers. More

Family photo in front of their station wagon in their driveway with PV in their front yard.

The Proof is in the Pudding

Dodd-Frank Act may complicate raising tax equity. More

Photo of solar PV panels.

Grazing in the Grass? Making Sense of the New BLM Rate Structure for Solar Projects

With 245 million acres under management, BLM is very popular with the solar developer set. More

Photo of bison grazing on BLM land.

Garden State Serves up Financing via Solar REC Auctions

Winners gain SREC contracts of $400/MWh for 10 years. More

Still photo from the film "Garden State" with main characters riding on a motorcycle.

Wind Energy in Seven Languages Revisited

An international perspective on the cost of wind energy. More

Photo of a group of wind turbines in motion.

REFTI Update

Thank you for your continued support of REFTI.

The results from Q3 2010 are now available on the website. Q3 2010 saw a decreased cost of tax equity as compared to previous quarters.

The Q4 2010 questionnaire will soon be open. Please look out for an e-mail announcement in the coming weeks.

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.

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