Tag Archives: Grant Info

Energy-Efficient Mortgages and Financing

Energy-Efficient Mortgages and Financing

The following Web sites offer information on energy-efficient financing programs, including mortgages, home improvement loans, refinancing, and home energy ratings. 

  • Financing an Energy-Efficient Home

    This fact sheet from the Department of Energy features an overview of energy-efficient financing programs from mortgages to home improvement loans.

  • U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development: Energy-Efficient Mortgage Program

    The Energy-Efficient Mortgage Program is one of many Federal Housing Authority programs that insure mortgage loans to encourage lenders to make mortgage credit available to borrowers, such as first-time homebuyers, who would not otherwise qualify for conventional loans on affordable terms.

  • Energy Ratings and Mortgages

    Energy efficient homes may qualify for mortgages that take into account a home’s efficiency. Residential Energy Services Network (RESNET) provides information on home energy rating systems, energy efficient mortgages, and finding certified energy raters and lenders who know how to process energy efficiency mortgages.

  • Refinancing for Energy-Efficiency Improvements

    An overview of refinancing to make energy efficiency improvements, from the Alliance to Save Energy.

Stay Tuned for updates… with all the news on Budget Cuts by out Elected Politicians…Who Knows what will happen with the Green Clean Energy Initiative?

DOE_Weatherization_Recovery_Act_Saves $1,200,000,000

  • weatherized more than 300,000 homes
  • reduce home energy bills
  • reduces energy consumption- average 35 percent
  • $400 saved bills 1st YR
  • 300,000 homes x $400 Saved = $1,200,000,000

 

email Scotts Contracting to schedule a Home Weatherization Inspection.   Scotty, will Analyze your Buildings Components and Supply a Proposal that will meet or exceed suggested Green Building Code– scottscontracting@gmail.com

  1. Computer Generated Reports
  2. Green Proposal will supply a ROI
  3. Cost Saving Analysis

Weatherization Doesn’t Cost it Saves


Secretary Chu Announces Major New Recovery Act Milestone: 300,000 Homes Weatherized

U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that states and territories across the country have now weatherized more than 300,000 low-income homes under the Recovery Act, a major milestone in the Department’s efforts to reduce home energy bills for families. This means that states are now more than 50 percent of the way toward meeting President Obama’s goal of weatherizing approximately 600,000 homes under the Recovery Act. The weatherization program is helping families save money on their energy bills by improving home energy efficiency with upgrades like insulation, air-sealing, and more efficient heating and cooling systems. The program has also trained a new generation of clean energy workers and is employing more than 15,000 workers nationwide.

“Today marks a major milestone for the weatherization program and shows once again that we are on pace to meet the goals of the Recovery Act. This program has already benefitted 300,000 low-income families and put thousands of people to work,” said Secretary Chu. “Through the weatherization program, we are laying the groundwork for a broader efficiency industry in the U.S. that will help grow our economy while saving money for American families.”

Through November, the network of state offices, local agencies, and weatherization providers has completed 300,000 homes. Of the total, more than 100,000 have been completed in just the last four months, showing the dramatically accelerated pace of weatherization under the program. A state-by-state breakdown of the homes weatherized through November is available at http://www.energy.gov/recovery/energyefficiency.htm.

Weatherization assistance reduces energy consumption for low-income families on average 35 percent, saving families on average more than $400 on their heating and cool bills in the first year alone. Nationwide, the weatherization of 300,000 homes is estimated to save $161 million in energy costs in just the first year.

DOE has worked closely with state and local governments to ensure the program is well-managed, responsive, and flexible. Nearly all of the states and territories involved in the program have met the milestone of weatherizing more than 30 percent of their targeted number of homes and many have completed more than half of their goals to date.

 

__________

Homes Weatherized by State

The Department of Energy is collecting monthly data from the states on the number of homes weatherized under the Recovery Act. The below spreadsheets shows figures for homes weatherized (1) in April 2010, and (2) in the first quarter of 2010 (January-March). In March, the weatherization network nationally reached their target run-rate and weatherized more than 25,000 homes across the country. Since the Recovery Act began, states have used their Recovery Act funding and annual program funds to weatherize more than 193,000 homes.

This is an end-of-the-year report on the number of homes weatherized by state as part of the Weatherization Assistance Program during calendar year 2009. This data was reported by states and may be updated as states finalize figures for homes weatherized through December 31st. By the end of 2009, states weatherized more than 125,000 homes with Recovery Act and non-Recovery Act annual federal funding. Since the Recovery Act funding allowed states to accelerate their existing programs with Fiscal Year 2009 funding, the combined total is the best indicator of progress in the program. Nevertheless, the pace of Recovery Act-funded weatherization tripled in the last three months of the year.

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email Scotts Contracting to schedule a Home Weatherization Inspection.   Scotty, will Analyze your Buildings Components and Supply a Proposal that will meet or exceed suggested Green Building Code– scottscontracting@gmail.com

  1. Computer Generated Reports
  2. Green Proposal will supply a ROI
  3. Cost Saving Analysis

Weatherization Doesn’t Cost it Saves

scottscontracting@gmail.com

Renewable Energy Rebates-Ameren UE-Federal Tax Incentive


Ameren UE Renewable Energy Rebate Program

Recently I was asked:

  • “Why does Ameren UE buy back the electricity created by Renewable Energy System on my House?”

When I directed the question to Ms L.Cosgrove[i] who handles the Local Ameren UE Renewable Energy Department.  She replied:

  • AmerenUE provides the MO Solar Rebate in response to Missourian’s passing Proposition C back in November, 2008[ii],[iii]”

In a nutshell it seems to me that Ameren UE will either have to build Renewable Energy Producing Systems or Purchase the Electricity that is made from Residents and Businesses to comply with the Law.
Which means that Ameren has a Stake in any Renewable Energy Sytem that produces Electricity and is Interconnected utilizing Net Metering to our / their Electircal Grid here in the St Louis Area.
Good News for all those who would like additional Monetary Incentives for Installing RE (Renewable Energy) Systems.
The Ameren Rebate and the Federal Tax Incentive can add up to as much as 2/3 of the cost of the RE System.
Click Here to Contact Scotty if any additional information is needed.

Posted by Scotty  Labels: , , , , , , , ,



[i] Lisa M. Cosgrove | Renewables Specialist  | 1901 Chouteau Avenue, MC 611 | St. Louis, MO 63103
314-554-2649 | fax 314-206-1387 | lcosgrove@ameren.com [ii] See http://www.sos.mo.gov/elections/2008petitions/2008-031.asp for more details.

[iii] 2008 Initiative Petitions
Approved for Circulation in Missouri

Amendment to Chapter 393 of the Revised Statutes of Missouri, Relating to Renewable Energy, version 4, 2008-031

THE PROPOSED AMENDMENT

Be it enacted by the people of the state of Missouri:Chapter 393, RSMo, is amended by repealing sections 393.1020, 393.1025, 393.1030, and 393.1035, and substituting therefor three new sections to be known as sections 393.1020, 393.1025 and 393.1030, to read as follows:393.1020. Sections 393.1025 to 393.1030 shall be known as the Renewable Energy Standard.393.1025. As used in sections 393.1020 to 393.1030, the following terms mean: 1. “Commission”, the public service commission; 2. “Department”, the department of natural resources; 3. “Electric utility”, any electrical corporation as defined by section 386.020; 4. “Renewable energy resources”, electric energy produced from wind, solar thermal sources, photovoltaic cells and panels, dedicated crops grown for energy production, cellulosic agricultural residues, plant residues, methane from landfills or from wastewater treatment, clean and untreated wood such as pallets, hydropower (not including pumped storage) that does not require a new diversion or impoundment of water and that has a nameplate rating of 10 megawatts or less, fuel cells using hydrogen produced by one of the above-named renewable energy sources, and other sources of energy not including nuclear that become available after the effective date of this section and are certified as renewable by rule by the department; and 5. “Renewable energy credit” or “REC”, a tradable certificate of proof that one megawatt-hour of electricity has been generated from renewable energy sources. 393.1030.1. The commission shall, in consultation with the department, prescribe by rule a portfolio requirement for all electric utilities to generate or purchase electricity generated from renewable energy resources. Such portfolio requirement shall provide that electricity from renewable energy resources shall constitute the following portions of each electric utility’s sales: (a) No less than two percent for calendar years 2011 through 2013; (b) No less than five percent for calendar years 2014 through 2017; (c) No less than ten percent for calendar years 2018 through 2020; and (d) No less than fifteen percent in each calendar year beginning in 2021.

At least two percent of each portfolio requirement shall be derived from solar energy. The portfolio requirements shall apply to all power sold to Missouri consumers whether such power is self-generated or purchased from another source in or outside of this state. A utility may comply with the standard in whole or in part by purchasing RECs. Each kilowatt-hour of eligible energy generated in Missouri shall count as 1.25 kilowatt-hours for purposes of compliance. 2. The commission, in consultation with the department and within one year of the effective date of sections 393.1020 to 393.1030, shall select a program for tracking and verifying the trading of renewable energy credits. An unused credit may exist for up to three years from the date of its creation. A credit may be used only once to comply with this act and may not also be used to satisfy any similar non-federal requirement. An electric utility may not use a credit derived from a green pricing program. Certificates from net-metered sources shall initially be owned by the customer-generator.  The… continues on web site


Clash of Titans-Renewable Energy Control Wars

The Renewable Energy Control Wars: Clash of Titans

Alternative Energy Production from Solar, Wind and other Renewable Energy Producing Systems
Scotty,Scotts Contracting: I hope this article will shed some insight into the US Grid system and how the Utility Companies view Alternative Energy Production from Solar, Wind and other Renewable Energy Producing Systems. I feel that: when more Homes are producing Energy for their use. It would lessen the Burden on Utility Companies- who in turn, would then be able to meet any Emergency Energy Demands. ?Large Scale Battery Back-Up Power ?

Article by Jon Previtali and Jon Guice, AltaTerra Research
Published: July 8, 2010

On June 25, we joined 500 executives at Stanford University for the 2010 Silicon Valley Energy Summit. The CEO of a large California utility company, Chris Johns of Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E), was the first keynote speaker. His topic was PG&E’s effort to roll out 10 million smart meters. At an average rate of 15,000 installations each day, the devices are the first and most important pieces of PG&E’s smart grid infrastructure. All PG&E customers will have electric and gas smart meters by the end of 2012.

Johns noted near-term benefits familiar to most of us: no physical meter reading, faster identification of grid faults, and most importantly, lower peak power as residential customers are given the double-edged sword of time-of-use rates and “near-time” energy pricing data for the purpose of managing their power use more cost effectively.

But to those of us who are thinking about the future through the lens of solar power and other distributed generation (DG), PG&E’s venture into the emerging smart grid space could mean much more. Smart meters could become the communications and control gateway to two major areas of progress for the solar power industry:

1) An increase in solar power yield through better system monitoring and remote inverter repair.

2) The deployment of much higher photovoltaic (PV) penetrations than are currently allowed in power distribution networks.

Demand for accurate solar power system monitoring and remote repair has been increasing since the commercial solar market shifted to a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) model in which PV system operators are paid for energy delivered. There is clear incentive to maximize generation and minimize downtime. Solar monitoring companies such as FST, Draker Labs, Energy Recommerce (now National Semiconductor), and Deck stepped up to serve this market, and PPA company SunEdison even introduced its own monitoring system.

This demand has also encouraged module and inverter companies to make customer relationships more “sticky” by bundling monitoring systems that work with portfolios of systems made for their products. Module companies such as SunPower and Suntech offer complete system packages with bundled monitoring systems. Inverter companies, including Satcon, PV Powered (now owned by Advanced Energy), and SMA, are dedicating more development cycles to monitoring, communications, and control features. We also expect utility supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) companies will start to support big new utility projects such as Southern California Edison’s and PG&E’s massively distributed 250 megawatt (MW) PV implementations.

The second initiative—high-penetration PV—has even higher stakes for the solar industry.

Today, grid operators get nervous when as much as a few percent of peak load is met by renewable energy (RE) within a distribution area served by a substation. As a result, we see rules across the country that directly limit the size of solar power systems and the amount of peak load that can be met by RE. Hawaii’s most populous island, Oahu, is a good example. The following rule is taken from the North Carolina Solar Center’s DSIRE Database:

For customers of Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO), the maximum individual system capacity is 100 kW. The aggregate capacity of net-metered systems is limited to 1% of HECO’s peak demand. Of this 1% limit, 40% is reserved for systems 10 kW or smaller.

Rules like this hinder the growth of the solar power industry. Oahu has an estimated 1.2 gigawatts (GW) of peak load. The above rule reduces that 1.2 GW to 7.2 MW of commercial solar power systems allowed on the island. At 40 cents per kilowatt hour (kWh), a common revenue target after incentives, the maximum number of commercial solar power systems on Oahu would generate $4.3 million per year. Unfortunately, that’s about what a single supermarket makes each year.

So, what’s the problem? Hawaii’s electricity comes mostly from foreign oil, they’re ranked among the highest in greenhouse gas (GHG) emitting states, and they pay the highest price for electricity. Meanwhile, they have a lot of sun. It seems they would want PV everywhere. The explanation: they don’t think their grid can handle that much solar power.

And they may be right. PV systems produce power at variable rates based on available sunlight. They also automatically disconnect from the grid when they sense poor power quality or no grid power. There is no reason for concern when solar power fluctuation is a small percent of total power on a distribution grid. However, if it becomes too large, grid operators are responsible for compensating for dips and spikes. The problem is they can’t. Conventional power plants don’t ramp quickly enough, and operators don’t control customer demand.

Also, when distributed generation (DG) exceeds load in a substation area, it flows through transformers onto transmission lines—a prospect that makes grid operators shudder. Unless they’ve been upgraded to bidirectional relay equipment, substations are not equipped to handle “reverse flow,” meaning operators cannot measure or throttle power flowing onto transmission lines. And, if a transmission line fails, blackouts can occur.

This happened in Europe in 2006 when one of two redundant German transnational high-voltage lines was “idled” to allow a newly built cruise liner to pass underneath. The ship was late, night came, and two factors arose that resulted in the automatic curtailment of 10 million customers: an unusual rise in demand due to a cold snap in the south, and a common upsurge in wind power from the north. Despite debate over the root cause, the failure spawned Germany’s Medium Voltage Directive, which appears to be the first large-scale mandate of grid operator communications and control over third-party DG.

The directive gives grid operators the ability to remotely disable RE systems connected at 10-110 kilovolts (kV), requires power ramping to prevent harmful surges and dips, enables RE systems to ride through grid faults when linemen are clearly not at risk, and may require that inverters provide reactive power to correct voltage problems. The directive seems chiefly intended to manage wind power. It’s yet to be seen if it will be necessary for solar power management, because PV conveniently generates during times when solar power is most likely to be consumed by adjacent loads.

In the U.S., a similar communications and control requirement is under development by the California Independent System Operator (CAISO), which proposed its version several months ago for RE systems connected to California’s transmission system. Some industry prognosticators believe the CAISO requirements will also be adopted by utility grid operators to manage single systems and system portfolios in the MW range. Considering the concern among operators, this seems like a reasonable prediction, especially as California approaches its limit for net-metered DG, currently set at 5% of peak demand.

The race is on for communications and control within the RE industry. At AltaTerra, we’ve coined the phrase Distributed Generation Communications and Control (DGC2) to describe this burgeoning area of information technology. With the addition of automated control intelligence to system monitoring, we believe DGC2 will be essential for the coordination of all forms of DG with RE-supply and conventional demand forecasting, dynamic pricing, smart grid transmission and distribution components, SCADA systems, and a wide range of load-shedding smart grid devices yet to come. DGC2 will be the brains that direct these new and not-so-new technologies to work together to reduce peak load, dampen RE variability, and safeguard grid operations as we blow past the current limits to RE DG.

Jon Guice is the co-founder and Managing Director of Research at AltaTerra Research.

Jon Previtali has 13 years experience in product management, specializing in renewable energy and related fields such as energy efficiency, smart grid devices and energy storage. Prior to AltaTerra, at SunEdison, the largest generator of solar power in North America, Mr. Previtali managed the operations service for third-party systems, assisted in the development of the solar power fleet monitoring system and developed a high-penetration PV-grid integration strategy. Jon Previtali also launched SunEdison’s channel partner program, which has resulted in over 100 MW of solar power projects and is today responsible for the majority of SunEdison’s system construction. Earlier, Mr. Previtali was the Director of Product Management for Monitoring and Reporting Services at Digital Island, a leading Internet infrastructure firm. He holds a B.S. in Civil Engineering from Stanford (1993) and an M.S. in Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering from the University of Colorado, Boulder (2007).

The information and views expressed in this article are those of the author and not necessarily those of RenewableEnergyWorld.com or the companies that advertise on its Web site and other publications.

Ground Source Heat Pumps, University of Missouri

U.S. Department of Energy – Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Geothermal Technologies ProgramLarge Scale GSHP as Alternative Energy for American Farmers

This is a summary of a project funded on a cost-shared basis by the U.S. Department of Energy through its Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP). This work is one of several projects funded by GTP under its mission to conduct research, development, and demonstration to advance geothermal energy technologies. This summary was prepared as part of the application process by the subsequent recipient of a funding opportunity grant and is offered only as a general overview of the project’s scope and direction at the time of the award.

view complete article here:http://apps1.eere.energy.gov/geothermal/projects/projects.cfm/ProjectID=109?print

Renewable Energy Funding Sources

Funding Enterprise offers a comprehensive array of funding options for interested developers. Explore the funding options below.

 

Grants

Enterprise offers Planning and Construction, Charrette and Sustainability (http://www.greencommunitiesonline.org/tools/funding/grants) grants to help cover the costs of planning and implementing green components of affordable housing developments, as well as tracking their costs and benefits.

Loans

We offer Predevelopment, and Acquisition Loans (http://www.greencommunitiesonline.org/tools/funding/loans) to support the development of affordable rental and home ownership housing that adheres to Green Communities Criteria.

Low-Income Housing Tax Credit Equity

Competitively priced Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) equity (http://www.greencommunitiesonline.org/tools/funding/housing.asp)to nonprofit and for-profit developers for new construction and/or rehabilitation of affordable rental housing that generally adheres to the Green Communities Criteria.

info provided by: scottscontracting@gmail.com Scott’s Contracting, St Louis, MO info found at:http://www.greencommunitiesonline.org/tools/funding/

US Dept of Treasury,Payments for Specified Renewable Energy Property in Lieu of Tax Credits

Payments for Specified Energy Property in Lieu of Tax Credits

To view or print the PDF content on this page, download the free Adobe® Acrobat® Reader®

APPLY

The Treasury Department is now accepting applications for this program. To apply go to https://treas1603.nrel.gov/.

GUIDANCE

Posted here are the guidance document pdf icon, terms and conditions pdf icon, and sample application form pdf icon. All applicants should carefully review these documents prior to submitting an application.

ACCOUNTANT’S CERTIFICATION

The independent accountants’ requirements for the examination opinion attesting to the accuracy of costs (Attachment A) have been revised. We have added clarifying language that requires accountants to attest to the accuracy of costs on a test basis. Statements have been added regarding management’s and the practitioner’s responsibilities and we have added a “Report of Management on Eligible Cost Basis”.

Attachment B, Agreed-upon Procedures (AUPs), has been revised. If you have questions on the AUPs, please send them to 1603Questions@do.treas.gov

For properties placed in service having a cost basis in excess of $500,000, applicants must submit an Accountant’s Certification pdf icon.

ASSIGNMENT OF PAYMENTS

For information on assigning payments received under this program to a financial institution click on the following links:

* Assignment Information pdf icon

* Notice of Assignment pdf icon

IMPORTANT REMINDER

Applicants must be registered with the Central Contractor Registration (CCR). To register, go to http://www.ccr.gov/startregistration.aspx. This registration must be completed before a payment can be made.

Thank you for your interest in this program.

Questions. Please e-mail any questions you may have to 1603Questions@do.treas.gov. Please note that the purpose of the 1603 mailbox is to answer questions regarding how to apply for the 1603 program. This includes: how to submit an application, assign a payment, and prepare the independent accountant’s report. We also answer general questions regarding applicant and property eligibility. We cannot, however, answer questions that are more appropriately answered by tax accountants, lawyers and the Internal Revenue Service. This includes questions regarding what can and cannot be included in cost basis and whether or not certain business structures meet eligibility requirements. Also, we cannot confirm eligibility for specific projects.

If you have already applied for the Section 1603 payment and have questions on your application, or need technical support to up-load documents, change your password, or seek confirmation of additional up-loaded documents, please address those questions to: treas1603@nrel.gov.

US Dept of Treasury,Payments for Specified Renewable Energy Property in Lieu of Tax Credits

Payments for Specified Energy Property in Lieu of Tax Credits

To view or print the PDF content on this page, download the free Adobe® Acrobat® Reader®

APPLY

The Treasury Department is now accepting applications for this program. To apply go to https://treas1603.nrel.gov/.

GUIDANCE

Posted here are the guidance document pdf icon, terms and conditions pdf icon, and sample application form pdf icon. All applicants should carefully review these documents prior to submitting an application.

ACCOUNTANT’S CERTIFICATION

The independent accountants’ requirements for the examination opinion attesting to the accuracy of costs (Attachment A) have been revised. We have added clarifying language that requires accountants to attest to the accuracy of costs on a test basis. Statements have been added regarding management’s and the practitioner’s responsibilities and we have added a “Report of Management on Eligible Cost Basis”.

Attachment B, Agreed-upon Procedures (AUPs), has been revised. If you have questions on the AUPs, please send them to 1603Questions@do.treas.gov

For properties placed in service having a cost basis in excess of $500,000, applicants must submit an Accountant’s Certification pdf icon.

ASSIGNMENT OF PAYMENTS

For information on assigning payments received under this program to a financial institution click on the following links:

* Assignment Information pdf icon
* Notice of Assignment pdf icon

IMPORTANT REMINDER

Applicants must be registered with the Central Contractor Registration (CCR). To register, go to http://www.ccr.gov/startregistration.aspx. This registration must be completed before a payment can be made.

Thank you for your interest in this program.

Questions. Please e-mail any questions you may have to 1603Questions@do.treas.gov. Please note that the purpose of the 1603 mailbox is to answer questions regarding how to apply for the 1603 program. This includes: how to submit an application, assign a payment, and prepare the independent accountant’s report. We also answer general questions regarding applicant and property eligibility. We cannot, however, answer questions that are more appropriately answered by tax accountants, lawyers and the Internal Revenue Service. This includes questions regarding what can and cannot be included in cost basis and whether or not certain business structures meet eligibility requirements. Also, we cannot confirm eligibility for specific projects.

If you have already applied for the Section 1603 payment and have questions on your application, or need technical support to up-load documents, change your password, or seek confirmation of additional up-loaded documents, please address those questions to: treas1603@nrel.gov.